Tell Me Who You Are: Sharing Our Stories of Race, Culture, & Identity

Tell Me Who You Are: Sharing Our Stories of Race, Culture, & Identity

An eye-opening exploration of race in America

In this deeply inspiring book, Winona Guo and Priya Vulchi recount their experiences talking to people from all walks of life about race and identity on a cross-country tour of America. Spurred by the realization that they had nearly completed high school without hearing any substantive discussion about racism in school, the two young women deferred college admission for a year to collect first-person accounts of how racism plays out in this country every day--and often in unexpected ways.

In Tell Me Who You Are, Guo and Vulchi reveal the lines that separate us based on race or other perceived differences and how telling our stories--and listening deeply to the stories of others--are the first and most crucial steps we can take towards negating racial inequity in our culture. Featuring interviews with over 150 Americans accompanied by their photographs, this intimate toolkit also offers a deep examination of the seeds of racism and strategies for effecting change.

This groundbreaking book will inspire readers to join Guo and Vulchi in imagining an America in which we can fully understand and appreciate who we are.

Title:Tell Me Who You Are: Sharing Our Stories of Race, Culture, & Identity
ISBN:9780525541127
Format Type:

    Tell Me Who You Are: Sharing Our Stories of Race, Culture, & Identity Reviews

  • Roxane

    In Tell Me Who You Are, Priya Vulchi and Winona Guo do exactly that--tell us who they are, how they have come to thinking so carefully, so deeply about race, and how they want to create change. From A...

  • Nathan Albright

    This book was a terrible one.  Yet it is the sort of terrible book that is instructive in discussing the authors’ views of race and identity.  Such a book is worse than useless, harmful even, but ...

  • Ruby

    "White people are so worried about being uncomfortable for one moment, while we're uncomfotable all the time. You really do get exhausted talking about this.""The oppressed shouldn't have to do it all...

  • Sabra

    The authors’ interjections of facts failed to challenge the conflation and confusion of race and ethnicity; they perpetuated it. Listening to that was akin to nails on a chalkboard for me. African A...

  • Emily

    There are so many lives to live and no two are the same. This book is a thought provoking collection of snippets on race and intersectionality. I appreciated how most of the stories included pictures ...

  • Annah

    Priya and Winona take a year off before college to travel around the US, collect racial narratives from every state, tie them to sociological terms, stats, and trends, and assemble these into a timely...

  • Kdorman

    Tell Me Who You Are is an exploration of who we can be if we close the heart mind gap and listen, learn, and love with our hearts, minds.and histories. After hearing that we form our thoughts about ra...

  • Austin Martin

    These individuals set out to do exactly what they planned on: gathering stories from others from all walks of life and different parts of the country. Throughout reading, I felt amazed at the hardship...

  • Lucyleith

    Surprising myself by rating this 5 stars--I feel like this book is exactly what it set out to be. It's educational and straightforward, and as repetitive as the interviews were (the same kinds of ques...

  • J.J.

    Important resource for learning to listen and engage with stories of race, class and gender from a younger perspective. Also good because there are lots of definitions as well as the authors motivatio...